Contact Jamie

Use the form on the right to contact Jamie Gloor. 

14 Plattenstrasse
Kreis 7, ZH, 8032
Switzerland

Jamie L Gloor is an experienced, international researcher, educator and mentor. She is American born but currently resides in Zurich, Switzerland. Her research interests focus on individual and organizational health, including publications on diversity and leadership and research experience at prestigious universities across four different continents. 

News

Exciting news, research, updates, & events!

 

Filtering by Tag: yale

Allergies, extra weight tied to bullying

Miranda Peterson

In another study, researchers from Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut, found that almost two-thirds of 361 teens enrolled in weight-loss camps had been bullied due to their size.

That likelihood increased with weight, so that the heaviest kids had almost a 100 percent chance of being bullied, Rebecca Puhl and her colleagues found. Verbal teasing was the most common form of bullying, but more than half of bullied kids reported getting taunted online or through texts and emails as well.

Read full article here. 

How Sweet It Is!

Miranda Peterson

Check out the new Rudd video released today coinciding with our new report on cereal marketing to kids:

Ever wonder how much sugar your child's cereal contains? The Rudd Center presents this quick video to answer the question, and pose one of our own. Check out "How Sweet It Is!" Research conducted by the Rudd Center shows that children will eat low-sugar cereals, and even when allowed to add sugar to the cereal, tend to add much less sugar than a sugar-sweetened children's cereal contains.

Don’t Call My Kid Fat! Parents Want Doctors to Talk About ‘Unhealthy Weight’

Miranda Peterson

Rudd Center research published in article on Time Magazine website. 

With 2 million U.S. children classified as extremely obese, it’s impossible to ignore kids’ growing girth. But researchers at the Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity at Yale University are suggesting that there are better, more sensitive ways to discuss the issue with parents and children.

“Many people find the term ‘fat’ to be pejorative and judgmental,” says Rebecca Puhl, the study’s lead author and Rudd’s director of research. “A lot of the time, providers have positive intentions, but the language they use can be seen as blaming, accusatory and not helpful.”

Read full article here.